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we saw wut u did thar, paramount
Avatar Calligrapher Professor S.L. Lee Shares A Statement 
29th-Jul-2009 03:19 pm
boulderangry
Racebending.com has received two statements from two staff members who worked on the original animated series Avatar: The Last Airbender. Here's the first of the two. Earlier this month, Professor S.L. Lee spoke out against racebending on San Francisco's 94.1 KPFA radio. Lee's statement today confirms fan speculation that Chinese calligraphy has been cut from The Last Airbender and will be replaced with a gibberish language.

I just received words from the movie producers. They are not going to use Chinese calligraphy at all, replacing it with unreadable symbols. I won't be participating in the movie.

It is not only a disappointment on the cast. They are removing all the successful elements of the original TV series. I think that would keep a lot of Asian audience away.

I am disappointed to learn that the Avatar movie has removed the successful cultural elements of the original Avatar TV series. Whether this is a right decision will be seen in the box office.
- Professor Siu-Leung Lee, cultural consultant, Avatar: The Last Airbender


Fans familiar with the series know that traditional Chinese calligraphy was an important part of not only the show's aesthetic, but also it's plot development and world building.

Lee also said:

"Chinese calligraphy is not only appreciated by Chinese, it is also a language understood by many East Asian countries. Quite a few of them are intensifying an effort to learn the language. Its aesthetics have influenced many western artists, including Picasso and Matisse."


East Asian Calligraphy is a significant component of the animated series's pan-Asian fantasy world. Because it was not made up squiggles, but an actual language that could be dissected at length, it brought a lot of verismilitude and believability to the world of the Four Nations. Given the ubiquity and spread of Hanzi in Ancient Asia, it made a lot of sense to make traditional Chinese the universal language of the Avatar world.

In addition to being in the series title/logo and the ending card of the last episode, "The End", Chinese calligraphy is also used liberally to depict aspects of the Avatar world. This includes writing signs, wanted posters, books, ancient artifacts, and other plot devices that call for the depiction of a writing system.



The art of Chinese calligraphy itself is given it's due in Season 3, when Master Piandao teaches Sokka that the dexterity involved in mastering calligraphy can be applied to other tasks, like swordfighting.

Piandao: When you write your name, you stamp the paper with your identity. You must learn to use your sword to stamp your identity on a battlefield. Remember, you cannot take back a stroke of the brush, or a stroke of the sword.


Replacing a real, eons-old written language with made up squiggles erases a lot of the franchise's identity. Using generic, fantasy-fare un-decipherables wipes out lot of the culture and authenticity from The Last Airbender--and that will be hard for them to take back.
Comments 
29th-Jul-2009 11:15 pm (UTC)
I'm getting horribly accustomed to hearing all of the hideous things going on in this movie, but this one just ... broke my fucking heart.

Unreadable symbols.

They can't take back the strokes of the brush, so they'll mutilate them and pretend they were the authors all along.
29th-Jul-2009 11:33 pm (UTC)
I still love you, Avatar, for teaching me how to say/write "abandon hope" in Chinese! <3

Cheapskate movie makers...
29th-Jul-2009 11:45 pm (UTC)
Cheap? Even if they didn't hire Prof. Lee, a lot of the material (like calligraphy on signs, scrolls, etc)from the animated series they still own and could easily reproduce for the film version.

If anything, it seems more time consuming to make up consistent unreadable gibberish than to use pre-established material. But maybe not.
29th-Jul-2009 11:42 pm (UTC)
Uhg, just makes me ill.
29th-Jul-2009 11:44 pm (UTC)
Wow. This is horrible!
29th-Jul-2009 11:46 pm (UTC)
I am disappointed to learn that the Avatar movie has removed the successful cultural elements of the original Avatar TV series. Whether this is a right decision will be seen in the box office. They could make a hundred million dollars at the box office, but it will never be the right one. This is unsurprising. Either they believe and Asian world won't see (which is just silly), or they're trying to cover up their Racism by white-washing the whole movie, not just the actors (equally silly, but for different reasons). *sigh*
30th-Jul-2009 01:42 am (UTC)
"or they're trying to cover up their Racism by white-washing the whole movie, not just the actors"

I would tend to agree, but they're doing a really half-assed job. Why go to the trouble of flying to Greenland (way out in the middle of nowheresville, population 60,000, 88% Inuit), if you're just after a snowy bit of scenery? There are cheaper ways to get snow. Narnia didn't fly to goddamn Greenland. Why import fully grown Asian trees? No one gives a flying crap about what the trees look like. And why Asian trees? Why not Cypress from Italy or Boab trees from Australia?

Why indeed unless they are acknowledging the cultural heritage of the show, and want to remain true to its spirit?

But then they take out the Chinese calligraphy, totally mess up the martial arts/bending, and, oh yeah, take out all the Asian and Inuit leads.

It's like they want to do Avatar, but they keep getting scared by all the inscrutable foreign stuff. So we get this bastardized, bland, racist crap instead. Feh.
29th-Jul-2009 11:47 pm (UTC)
So now they've got the Asian architecture and the Asian garb, but to hell with the Asian language or the Asian people! Good fucking god.
30th-Jul-2009 12:53 am (UTC)
Oh, but it's not really Asian - any of it. It's just a fantasyland!

...I'm going to go cry now.
29th-Jul-2009 11:53 pm (UTC)
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us


Frank Marshall is an embarrassment.
30th-Jul-2009 12:25 am (UTC)
Replacing a real, eons-old written language with made up squiggles erases a lot of the franchise's identity. Using generic, fantasy-fare un-decipherables wipes out lot of the culture and authenticity from The Last Airbender--and that will be hard for them to take back.

What ticks me off about this? Peter Jackson used the languages seen in the LotR books in his film - both written and spoken. Tolkien provided so much detail, and did so much research on, the languages he created, and Jackson respected that.

So a fantasy language that one man created gets more respect then a REAL language, spoken by REAL people. >(
30th-Jul-2009 01:00 am (UTC)
"So a fantasy language that one man created gets more respect then a REAL language, spoken by REAL people."

LOL I was just thinking the same thing.
(no subject) - Anonymous - Expand
But... - Anonymous - Expand
30th-Jul-2009 12:30 am (UTC)
Just when I didn't think my opinion on this whole mess could get any worse.
30th-Jul-2009 12:51 am (UTC)
Well, to make a dramatic understatement, that's lame as hell.
31st-Jul-2009 02:06 am (UTC)
Not to jump on you, but actually lame is not such a good word to use, because it implies not being able to walk as a moral failing. Here's a list to a good set of alternatives!
(Deleted comment)
30th-Jul-2009 02:02 am (UTC)
This is absolutely disgraceful.
30th-Jul-2009 02:06 am (UTC)
What. The fuck.

30th-Jul-2009 02:21 am (UTC)
So, is it still too early to start calling it AINO (Avatar In Name Only)? B/c this sure as heck is not the Avatar I watched. And if M Night is supposedly a fan of Avatar, then we were clearly watching two different shows that just happened to have characters of the same name.

Something to use in anticipation of the "well, it's also racist to have all these non-Chinese people write in Chinese" argument - Chinese culture has, for a long time, been the main culture in East Asia that in turn influenced the cultures of other East Asian countries, such as Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Japanese still retains a lot of Hanzi (that's what "Kanji" means), and Korea used Chinese characters up until the 14th century until they came up with their own writing.
(Deleted comment)
30th-Jul-2009 02:33 am (UTC)
I'm so angry I'm crying.
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